Joseph Morsette

Joseph Morsette
Adjunct
College of Law
Law

Bio

Professor Joseph Henry Morsette (Chippewa-Cree Tribe) is a practicing tribal attorney and currently serves as the Staff Attorney for the Legislative Branch of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes. Some of Professor Morsette’s prior employment included Assistant Attorney General for the Meskwaki Nation where he provided in-house counsel duties to the Tribal Council (Executive and Legislative Branches) along with representing the Tribal Council in the Meskwaki Nation Tribal Courts in civil litigation, child support, criminal, and juvenile court. Professor Morsette was also a Faculty Fellow at the University of North Dakota School of Law; Chief Judge for the Spirit Lake Nation; Appellate Justice for the White Earth Nation; and Associate Judge for the Chippewa-Cree Tribe. Professor Morsette is a highly decorated combat veteran of foreign wars having served honorably in both the United States Army and Air Force. Professor Morsette is also a former federal police officer with the Bureau of Indian Affairs having successfully graduated from the federal law enforcement training center in Artesia, NM. Professor Morsette holds a Master of Laws from the University of Arizona College of Law; a Juris Doctorate from the University of North Dakota School of Law; a Master of Sciences in Criminal Justice Administration; a Bachelor of Sciences in Criminal Justice, Law Enforcement Concentration from the University of Great Falls; and an Associate of Arts in Liberal Arts from Stone Child College in Rocky Boy, MT. Professor Morsette currently lives in Yukon, OK. He is married to beautiful Juanita Benally-Morsette. Together they have six children, and two grandchildren. E-mail: jhm5709@utulsa.edu Cell: (406) 262-4916

Research Interests

American Indians and the US federal exclusionary rule.
The Anishinaabe, the legal history of how the Chippewa-Cree Tribe became now known under the IRA of 1934.

Teaching Interests

Tribal government
criminal jurisdiction in Indian country
police theory and practices
principles of federal Indian law
Tribal law and tribal constitutions
Indian civil rights versus customary rights
Family law in Indian country
Tribal criminal law and procedure